Mission Statement

Our primary mission is to positively motivate those individuals who have the will but lack the courage; to educate, enlighten and enrich those individuals who have the courage but lack the direction, and finally, to hold accountable those individuals who have the will, courage, and direction but lack the discipline. Our ultimate dream is to positively impact your quality of life through fitness.December 2, 2013 -Marquis Fitness opened for business. It all started with Sugar F.Y.X. Fitness Studio in 2008 then evolved to Strong Fitness, at 9500 square feet the largest facility I've ever opened, in 2011. When I moved on from Strong I realized that for me bigger was not better and as such I decided to go back to the beginning and open another fitness studio, but this time apply all that I had learned in the past to implement my complete vision from day one. I have the priviledge of helping my brothers and sisters to elevate their quality of life through fitnss.

MFIT VISION

Marquis Fitness is a revolutionary program postured towards flexibility and convenience. For those individuals who are inspired toward dynamic health and fitness gratification, Marquis Fitness will mobilize to your working environment utilizing productive fitness practices and proper nutritional support innovations. Both short and long range barriers commonly existing in today's society and often leading to obesity, diabetes, and depression can and will be combated via the Marquis Fitness regimen. The intrinsic and extrinsic manifestations of daily anxiety and stress can be reduced and / or eliminated through a proprietary and systematic instructional module carefully crafted to sprout the determined results only you know exist and desire for yourself.MFIT Training Videos- There is no perfect method of training. The truth is that we are all individually powerful complete with our own predisposed inclinations to Power Training, Strength Training, Gymnastics, Athletic Development, Yoga, Pilates, Cross Training, Cardiovascular Training and Anaerobic Training. I believe that a combination of all these is what is necessary to achieve optimum fitness and enjoyment. It is my hope that these video examples give you some new direction on your own fitness practices. That being said please do not attempt any exercise that your body is not prepared for. If you are unsure as to what this means for your safety I urge you to contact me prior to trying out these advanced maneuvers. Enjoy watching

Importance Of Water

A healthy body has just the right amount of fluid inside and outside of each cell also known as fluid balance. If too little water is inside a cell, it shrivels and dies. If there’s too much water then the cell bursts. Your body is mostly water (50 to 70%). Water is used by the body to digest food, dissolving nutrients so that they can pass through the intestinal cell walls into your bloodstream and move food along through your intestinal tract. Water is used to carry waste products out of your body. Water provides a medium in which biochemical reactions such as metabolism (digesting food, producing energy and building tissue) occur. Water is used to send electrical messages between cells so that your muscles can move, your eyes can see, your brain can think and so on. Water is used to regulate body temperature – cooling your body with moisture that evaporates on your skin. Water is used to lubricate moving body parts. Proper Hydration for Athletes- A general rule of thumb is to consume 500ml per hour of vigorous exercise in addition to the two liters per day. In practice, the need varies from person to person and the best thing to do is to measure yourself. This is quite easy to do with a simple test. One liter of water weighs one kilogram. By measuring your weight before and after training or a test event and correcting for any fluids taken in, you will get an individual rate of fluid lost for those conditions. For example, a 70kg athlete who loses 200 grams during a one hour training session whilst drinking a 500ml drink will have a gross loss of: (Finish weight - start weight) - (weight of amount drink) or 69.8 - 70.0 - 0.5 = -0.7kg or -700g This gross loss is equivalent to 700mL of fluid per hour. This figure would help the athlete plan fluid needs during an event. A further adjustment would be needed if the conditions of the test training were different to the event. A 70kg 2:30 marathon runner can lose as much as 5L (5kg) of body fluid in that time!

Got Sleep?

The quality of your sleep directly affects the quality of your waking life, including your productivity, emotional balance, creativity, physical vitality, and even your weight. No other activity delivers so many benefits with so little effort! Sleep isn’t merely a time when your body shuts off. While you rest, your brain stays busy, overseeing a wide variety of biological maintenance that keeps your body running in top condition, preparing you for the day ahead. Without enough hours of restorative sleep, you won’t be able to work, learn, create, and communicate at a level even close to your true potential. Regularly skimp on “service” and you’re headed for a major mental and physical breakdown. The good news is that you don't have to choose between health and productivity. As you start getting the sleep you need, your energy and efficiency will go up. In fact, you're likely to find that you actually get more done during the day than when you were skimping on shuteye. There is a big difference between the amount of sleep you can get by on and the amount you need to function optimally. Just because you're able to operate on seven hours of sleep doesn't mean you wouldn't feel a lot better and get more done if you spent an extra hour or two in bed. While sleep requirements vary slightly from person to person, most healthy adults need between 7.5 to 9 hours of sleep per night to function at their best. Children and teens need even more (see Average Sleep Needs table below). And despite the notion that our sleep needs decrease with age, older people still need at least 7.5 to 8 hours of sleep. Since older adults often have trouble sleeping this long at night, daytime naps can help fill in the gap. The best way to figure out if you're meeting your sleep needs is to evaluate how you feel as you go about your day. If you're logging enough hours, you'll feel energetic and alert all day long, from the moment you wake up until your regular bedtime.

Concentration is often referred to as the executive mental toughness skill because of its ability to control all others. With a high level of concentration on a task, a person can block out negative distractions making room for optimal motivation, confidence and positive emotional and physiological state.

When it comes to motivation we all seek two things: 1- Pleasure or need for achievement 2- Avoid pain or fear of failure

People who are motivated by a need for achievement and success place themselves in challenging situations that create opportunities for growth. These individuals don’t like failure, but they’re not afraid of it and are thus willing to risk it.

People who are motivated by fear of failure still try very hard but choose less challenging tasks, as a way of protecting their self-esteem – even though this approach can be detrimental to their long-term motivation and overall results.

Confidence is the belief in our ability to meet the demands of a given situation. Performance accomplishments are the greatest source of confidence. Focus on the process of performance rather than the over-all results.

Like the sun rising at the beginning of your day the body is just as beautiful but let us not forget that like that sunrise our bodies also serve a very real purpose. That sun rises to bring us light and life and our bodies exist as a vessel to hold the very essence of our energy and provide us with the means to connect to every living thing on this planet.

Most focus on outcome alone as society has placed the most importance on the end result, which is not incorrect, however it can cause an individual to lose sight of the performance and the process aspect of attaining their goals.

Macros

The role of carbs in the body include providing energy for working muscles, fuel for the central nervous system, enabling fat metabolism and preventing protein from being used as an energy source. After carbs are eaten, it is broken down into smaller units of sugar (including glucose, fructose and galactose) in the stomach and small intestine. These small units of sugar are absorbed in the small intestine and then enter the bloodstream where they travel to the liver. Fructose and galactose are converted to glucose in the liver. Glucose is the carbohydrate transported by the bloodstream to the various tissues and organs, including the muscles and the brain, where it will be used as energy. Carbs are the body’s main source of fuel. Carbs are easily used by the body for energy. All of the tissues and cells in our body can use glucose for energy. Carbs are needed for the central nervous system, the kidneys, the brain, and the muscles to function properly. Carbs can be stored in the muscles and liver and later used for energy. Carbs are important in intestinal health and waste elimination. Fiber refers to certain types of carbs that our body cannot digest. These carbs pass through the intestinal tract intact and help to move waste out of the body. All living cells contain glucose. For glucose to enter the cells it needs help from a hormone called insulin. Insulin acts as gatekeeper and is released once carbohydrates are ingested. It signals the cells to absorb the glucose. The glucose is then used for energy, stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen, or stored as fat. A well-nourished adult can store approximately 500 grams or 2000 kcal or carbohydrates. Of this, approximately 400 grams are stored as muscle glycogen, 90-110 grams as liver glycogen, and 25 grams circulate in the blood as glucose. When the body needs more glucose than is available in the bloodstream to support energy demands, glycogen stores are used to raise blood glucose levels. It is important to note that the glycogen stored in muscle is used directly by that muscle during exercise, it cannot borrow glycogen from other resting muscles.

Proteins are essential for growth and maintenance of body tissues. Muscles, hormones, enzymes and antibodies are all made of proteins. Proteins aid blood clotting, fluid balance, buffering, vision and transportation of vital substances throughout the body. Protein can be metabolized as energy when carbohydrate and fate are in short supply. Proteins comprise 17% of your body weight, which except for water, forms the majority of lean tissue. If your diet lacks sufficient protein over time, many body processes slow down, eventually compromising your overall health. Organs such as the heart and liver may actually decrease in size, as will muscles and blood proteins. However, eating too much protein does not cause increased protein synthesis and growth.Proteins are found in every cell in your body, and are foundational for muscle, bone, skin, tendon and ligament structure. As your body makes new protein, it continually replaces dead or damaged cells to facilitate normal growth and maintenance. For example, skin cells typically live for 30 days. As these cells die, new ones composed primarily of protein grow underneath as replacements. Similar processes occur with muscles, hair and fingernails. Proteins carry lipids, vitamins, minerals and oxygen throughout your body. For example, hemoglobin, a blood protein, carries needed oxygen from the lungs to body tissues. Some proteins act as pumps in cell membranes, permitting substances to move across cell membranes. Specific proteins are capable of transferring particular substances; not all proteins move the same compounds. Proteins regulate fluid composition and balance in the body, preventing excessive fluid retention.

Provides a source of stored energy. Gives shape to the body. Cushions your skin. Acts as an insulation blanket that reduces heat loss. Part of every cell membrane (the outer skin that holds each cell together). A component of myelin, the fatty material that sheathes nerve cells and makes it possible for them to fire the electrical messages that enable you to think, see, speak, move and perform the multitude of tasks natural to a living body; brain tissue is also rich in fat. A shock absorber that protects your organs if you fall or are injured. In an average adult, as much as 9 pounds of fat is found around the liver, heart, kidneys and other organs. A constituent of hormones and other biochemicals such as vitamin D and bile. Allows you to transport, store and absorb the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, K. Fat-soluble vitamins help to regulate blood pressure, heart rate, blood vessel constriction, blood clotting, and the nervous system. Essential fatty acids form omega-3 and omega-6 fats cannot be made by your body and therefore must be supplied through your diet.

FAQ's

 
 

Calorie intake is as individualized as a human fingerprint. Height, age, gender, genetics, climate and activity level are the main contributing factors when determining the right amount of caloric intake. One must also take into consideration if one's goal is to lose weight, gain weight or maintain weight. I recommend that you first choose your goal then track your current intake pattern. From there you can begin to discovery what will help you achieve your goal and what has been hindering your progress. Go to the contact page and send me a message if you require further information.

The human brain uses 200 to 400 kilocalories per day, which equates to between 10 and 25 watts of power. For comparison's sake, that's about 10 to 25 percent of the power that it takes to run a 100-watt light bulb. A regular computer performing the same amount of calculations the same way the brain does would take more than 40 million times the energy that the brain uses.

Recovery refers to techniques and actions taken to maximize your body’s repair. These include hydration, nutrition, posture, heat, ice, stretching, self-myofascial release, stress management, compression, and time spent standing versus sitting versus lying down. Recovery is multifaceted and encompasses more than just muscle repair. Recovery involves chemical and hormonal balance, nervous system repair, mental state, and more.

Calorie intake is as individualized as a human fingerprint. Height, age, gender, genetics, climate and activity level are the main contributing factors when determining the right amount of caloric intake. One must also take into consideration if one's goal is to lose weight, gain weight or maintain weight. I recommend that you first choose your goal then track your current intake pattern. From there you can begin to discovery what will help you achieve your goal and what has been hindering your progress. Go to the contact page and send me a message if you require further information.

The human brain uses 200 to 400 kilocalories per day, which equates to between 10 and 25 watts of power. For comparison's sake, that's about 10 to 25 percent of the power that it takes to run a 100-watt light bulb. A regular computer performing the same amount of calculations the same way the brain does would take more than 40 million times the energy that the brain uses.

Recovery refers to techniques and actions taken to maximize your body’s repair. These include hydration, nutrition, posture, heat, ice, stretching, self-myofascial release, stress management, compression, and time spent standing versus sitting versus lying down. Recovery is multifaceted and encompasses more than just muscle repair. Recovery involves chemical and hormonal balance, nervous system repair, mental state, and more.

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